Why I Love The Obamas


There have been 43 White men as U.S. President.  President Obama finally broke up the club of whiteness and added some diversity.  He is truly in all aspects of the term African-American; since he was born to a White mother from the Midwest and an African father from Kenya.  When running for office there was a dichotomy of opinion whether he was Black enough or if he was too Black.  Some wondered would the White House now become the Black House?  During all the negative rhetoric I watched not with despair but with pride to see a Black man take the oath of office to become the 44th U.S. President.  Wait, let me correct, I listened while on Pennsylvania Avenue standing in Freedom Plaza along the Inauguration Parade route just around the corner from the White House on January 20, 2009.

My journey began way back with the Obamas in 1996, when as a Clinton-Gore volunteer, I was tasked with phone banking and making down ticket calls for Barack Obama.  I didn’t know much about him except he had done organizing within his community.  He was a lawyer at that point having graduated from Harvard Law School.  He also taught constitutional law these were snippets of information provided over the course of the ’96 campaign.  It was a joyous time when on November 5, 1996, President Clinton and Vice President Gore were re-elected and Barack Obama won his first election for the Illinois State Senate.  During the Victory Party at the Hyatt Regency in Chicago, getting my first hugs from Senator-elect Obama and his wife Michelle was heart-warming, yes they’ve always been huggers.

I relocated in 1997 to South Carolina, so Barack Obama was my Senator only for a short while.  However, I watched with pride when he was introduced to the world at the 2004 Democratic National Convention during the speech heard around the globe.  The most recognized part of the speech is:

“There’s not a black America and white America and Latino America and Asian America; there’s the United States of America.”

However, one of my favorite parts of the speech is:

“If there’s a child on the south side of Chicago who can’t read, that matters to me, even if it’s not my child.  If there’s a senior citizen somewhere who can’t pay for their prescription and having to choose between medicine and the rent, that makes my life poorer, even if it’s not my grandparent.  If there’s an Arab-American family being rounded up without benefit of an attorney or due process, that threatens my civil liberties.  It is that fundamental belief — it is that fundamental belief — I am my brother’s keeper; I am my sisters’ keeper — that makes this country work. It’s what allows us to pursue our individual dreams, yet still come together as a single American family: “E pluribus unum,” out of many, one.”

After hearing this phenomenal speech everyone wanted to know who is this State Senator and candidate for U.S. Senate?  I already knew and watched from that point waiting for the moment for when he would run for U.S. President.  It wasn’t a question of if but when.

Following many rumors in February 2007, in Springfield, Illinois U.S. Senator Barack Obama announced his run for U.S. President.  Among other U.S. Senators running were Joe Biden and Hillary Rodham Clinton.  In May 2007, I stopped by the South Carolina Obama Campaign Headquarters in Columbia, SC located on the corner of Calhoun and Assembly streets and began my volunteer efforts.  Starting off doing phone banking I knew my talent was better used in other capacities.  And over time soon became what I am known best as Data Goddess.  The Obama Campaign recreated how data as well as digital media was used during a campaign.  He created via his experience of community organizing a new mold for how to run a Presidential campaign.  With the blowout win of the South Carolina Presidential Democratic Primary, Obama and not Clinton became the candidate to beat.

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Taken by Staff Photographer in Manning, SC – November 2007

Upon becoming elected as the 44th President even during a campaign where rocks and stones were thrown his way, he pushed for an agenda passionate to him.  Unlike any other President before him his cabinet was filled with powerful and capable women.  Showing the importance of women, the first piece of legislation he signed was the “Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Restoration Act Bill.”  Over the last 8 years, President Obama has signed approximately 1,350 pieces of legislation into law.  His most famous and the piece of legislation marked for repeal by the 115th U.S. Congress is The Affordable Care Act.  Coming into the White House with a dysfunctional banking system and an auto industry near bankruptcy he made tough decisions in bailing both out with federal assistance.  Even when detractors thought this was not the better solution but time has shown it was the best solution.

There are far too many things to list regarding why I have such admiration for the Obama Administration.  However, I most respect the humanness of the President.  During addresses after shootings at Sandy Hook in Newtown, CT and last year at the Pulse Night Club in Orlando, Florida we saw a very human and compassionate President.  We also saw this when speaking about the killing of Trayvon Martin and during the numerous addresses made upon unjustified shooting of Black men and women by law enforcement across the nation.  It is the humanness, dignity, and intelligence that I most admire about President Obama.

With the incoming 45th President, I am greatly concerned about the openness and dignity that President Obama brought to the White House.  I do not have confidence in the leadership to come this is based on the vitriol hate displayed during the 2016 Presidential campaign by the Republican Presidential nominee.  I admit I am a staunch liberal and a leader within the South Carolina Democratic Party, so to many of course I admire and support President Obama.  However, I am fair and try not to pre-judge but what I have seen thus far from the U.S. President-Elect does not give me great confidence in the next four years.  I do not see an inclusive or diverse White House or one open to the public in the way the Obama Administration engaged the public.

I admit as a Black woman I have watched with pride the initiatives put in place by First Lady Michelle Obama.  She has worked for military families to getting young people moving and eating healthy to fighting for girls right to education around the globe.  Being a part of history also puts a smile in my heart.  On June 1, 2016, on behalf of the Columbia Museum of Art as their Community Member, I attended the ceremony and reception for 2016 National Medal for Museum and Library Service.  It was hosted by First Lady Michelle Obama in the East Room of the White House.  And to the surprise of us all while in the Blue Room we saw Marine One land and take off on the White House lawn!  This opportunity seemed to be a full circle moment from when I first met the Obama’s in Chicago, Illinois.

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2016 National Medal for Museum and Library Service Program

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Karen Brosius, Michelle Obama, Joyce Rose-Harris – White House East Room           June 2016

Finally, I say thank you President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama for your leadership and dedication to the American people.  Seeing a Black couple occupy the White House makes me proud not merely because they are Black but because they worked hard to get to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.  There was no silver spoon for them during their childhoods but there was the knowledge of how important it is to get an education and then to uplift their communities.  I will miss the weekly addresses by President Obama and the many initiatives of First Lady Obama but I know now they will take their work to Chicago, Illinois in a year or so, putting their knowledge and activism in the Obama Presidential Library and Center.  I know there is much more awesome things to come for the Obama family.  Thank you President and First Lady Obama for showing citizens of the United States and the world how to rise higher.

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A Library Nerd’s Birthday


Today 50 years ago, I was born.  I was a few weeks early and my mom thought she had indigestion, until her water broke.  I believe from the day and hour in which I was born, until the various dates of my parent’s deaths that I was loved.  My dad wasn’t there for my birth but he was always there for my life.  Birthdays were always special and involved a chocolate marble cake with the most delicious chocolate icing created by his hands.  It is from my parents that I learned to love books and reading.  Our house was always filled with all types of books novels, non-fiction, magazines, comic books, newspapers, if it had words we read it…and hoarded it.

Due to the genetic love of books it is no surprise where I came to write this blog today.  I sit in one of my favorite places.  The United States Library of Congress, specifically in the Main Reading Room.  I have had a library research/reader card for a few years now but it still felt magical to walk through the researchers only and accessed limited hallway.  Taking the reserved elevator and entering into the beautiful and majestic space that is the center of the universe of all U.S. libraries still gives me tingles.

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View from desk 334..Main Reading Room

Yes, I know most people want to spend their 50th birthday on an island or far away destination; however, I chose my nation’s capital city for this blessed day and week.  And purposely this space to write this blog post.  Washington, DC is a pivotal place for democracy even though lately there has been a stale mate among political parties.  However, I believe democracy is the better form of government.

Those who’ve followed my blog know that I support the Democratic Parties Presumptive Presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton.  Today the FBI advised that there were no findings to indicate malice or ill intent regarding to deleted or missing emails.  This translates to know recommendation of criminal charges by the FBI to the U.S. Justice Department.  I never thought there would be anything found.  It is frustrating to see all the rocks that have been thrown toward former Secretary Clinton.  My belief is that strong women and ironically even those who stand by their spouses still are given grief.  I am not going to go into why I support her…you can read that on my blog “Why I Support Hillary Clinton for President”.  My reasons have not changed.

Now, I know why not talk about something other than government?  Well being born the day after the nations 190th birthday, I get giddy about government and democracy.  Oh yes and fireworks as well as good ribs and family cookouts.  Yesterday there were cloudy fireworks but awesome cannon sounds.  My husband and I attended “A Capitol Fourth” produced and aired live by PBS.  Well interestingly the fireworks broadcast were not those we witnessed.  This was a big slight on PBS for omitting this information and not being upfront.  Still I saw many amazing entertainers including Smokey Robinson, Yolanda Adams, and Kenny Loggins.

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View of the Main Reading Room Dome

Looping back, I am sitting in the Library of Congress because I love libraries.  They are filled with so much knowledge and information ready for you to find and read.  I know if I lived in the DC area this would be my primary place to write and study.  I plan to return during this week but today the 50th anniversary of my birth, I had to come to this place.  I can close my eyes and smell the scent and hear the crinkle of books at my childhood library.  Fredrick Douglass Chicago Public Library in North Lawndale community is where I received my first library card.  I don’t know where the card is today but the memories are still within me.  And my love for libraries is even stronger.

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Clinton Shatters Glass Ceiling


Hillary_Clinton_official_Secretary_of_State_portrait_cropThe 19th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution passed in the Senate on June 4, 1919, this was 97 years ago.  The amendment reads “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.  Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”  Specifically, this amendment allowed women the right to vote.  This June history occurred, when Hillary Clinton became the first woman named as the presumptive Presidential nominee for a major political party.

Previously the closest a woman has come to being anywhere near the Presidency was when Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi was Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.  The invisible glass ceiling referring to women seeking to move up in business, government, or other leadership roles has been shattered.  I am happy, truly and honestly happy about a woman being a major party’s nominee but I wonder if the ceiling is self-healing?  Will the pieces come together again like in a sci-fi movie?  Or will there remain a clear opening for other women to rise through?

For females young and older around the U.S. I do believe that Clinton is a beacon of hope.  She has shown that even when mud and something else is slung her way she can take it.  This was shown back in October 2015 during an 11-hour hearing on Benghazi, like a true leader Hillary responded to the pounding of questions from the House Committee lead by Congressman Trey Gowdy (R-SC).  Most recently Clinton showed Presidential poise when she gave her speech on foreign policy.  In response to her speech and the comments around the instability of Donald Trump the presumptive republican nominee, Trump came back with random comments none of which related to his foreign policy plan.

Under constant investigation from when she was First Lady of the United States, U.S. Senator, and most recently Secretary of State, her record has and continues to be picked apart.  Just as President Obama faces obvious racism as the first African American President, Clinton will continue to face scrutiny if elected as the first woman President.  Sadly, the U.S. has issue with what is different and out of the norm and the norm are white males in leadership.  I would like to note that while giving her speech the night of major wins on June 7th she complemented her opponent Bernie Sanders.  Upon her comments there was respectful clapping of her supporters.  Yet when he complemented Clinton during his speech there were boos from the crowd.  Sanders did not even blink nor did he admonish the negative response.

Finally, I want there to be a day when we don’t have to focus on the fact a woman is in a position of power.  Whether it is the CEO of a major corporation or the nominee of a major political party.  The U.S. is merely catching up with other countries who have had female leaders for decades now.  Great Britain, Germany, Norway, India as well as many more nations have and have had female leaders in the highest offices or within the monarchy.  Now that this history has been made let’s move forward to the issues.

Content originally published by The MinorityEye on June 9, 2016

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Watching A Bill Become A Law


Collage of EventsThis week the theme song from Schoolhouse Rock animated special “I’m Just A Bill” which explained the legislative process has been on continuous loop in my head.  On Monday, July 6th debate on a controversial and historic South Carolina Senate Bill began.  Bill S. 897 introduced by Senator Vincent Sheheen was for removal of the Confederate battle flag from the SC State House grounds.  Senator Sheheen while campaigning for Governor in 2014 brought up the subject of removing the flag.  Now months into a new year, it seemed that the idea had passed.

On Wednesday, June 17th the horrific massacre of nine members of Mother Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston, SC helped to bring the Confederate battle flag debate to the forefront of South Carolina and the nations conscious.  There were strong connections shown with regard to the Confederate battle flag and white supremacy propaganda by Dylann Roof the 21-year-old charged with the nine murders.  It is believed that the act of true Christian behavior by the families of Rev. Senator Clementa Pinckney and eight of his parishioners: Sharonda Coleman-Singleton; Cynthia Hurd; Susie Jackson; Tywanza Sanders; Myra Thompson; Ethel Lance; DePayne Middleton-Doctor; and Daniel Simmons helped to make it necessary that the divisive symbol be removed from SC State House grounds.  Hearing the families forgive Roof and pray for his soul moved the world.

During a press conference on Monday, June 22, 2015 SC Governor Nikki Haley stated, “It’s time to move the flag from the Capitol grounds.” Haley a Republican had stated just weeks prior that she saw no need for removal of the flag. However, upon massacre of a former Senate college and eight others the need had become apparent.  On June 23rd Senator Vincent Sheheen drafted Senate Bill 897 for permanent removal of the Confederate battle flag.  The flag had flown on the SC State House dome and grounds since 1962, initially flying in memory of the Civil War.  Many have contended that the flag flew in defiance to the Civil Rights movement.  Those against removal of the flag toted that it represented Southern Heritage, which I point out included an economy with a labor force of enslaved Africans and their descendants.

Debate of the S. 897 began on Monday, July 6th in the Senate Chambers.  Realizing the significance of this Bill, I decided to visit the SC Senate Gallery to witness the beginning debates.  Three Republican Senators Bright, Peeler, and Verdin all from the Upstate known for it’s Republican stronghold voted against the Bill during the 2nd vote.  However, there were 37 votes for the Bill and that was a strong indication that it would pass.  As was expected on Tuesday, July 7th after very little additional debate the 3rd vote passed 36 to 3, well over the necessary 2/3 vote.  The Bill then went to the SC House for debate.

On Wednesday, July 8th the Senate Bill reached the house and immediately had 12 amendments made to it by Representative Quinn who like his three Update Senate counterparts was a conservative Republican.  Over the course of the day there were 60 total amendments made to the Bill.  Feeling that Wednesday would be a historic day, I headed to the SC State House for the second time that week after work.  I sat in utter amazement at the stubborn ignorance of some Representatives with regard to the need to pass the Bill without amendments.  There was push and pull as House members for and against the Bill spoke.  I was witness to the passionate cry for passing the Bill made by Rep. Jenny Horne from Charleston, SC, where she represented the families of the Charleston 9.  But more importantly Rep. Horne is a direct descendent of Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America.

A recess was given around 7:45pm and realizing that I was seeing history in the making, I decided to find a quick dinner and return for the continuation of the debate at 8:30pm.  There was more pushing and pulling as well as side discussions.  The Speaker of the House seemed to have to constantly bang the gavel to get order of the House Chambers.  We sitting in the House Gallery wondered if the Bill would ever pass.  Eventually most of the amendments were tabled and there was a stronghold on amendment 56, which provided detail for placement of the Confederate battle flag upon its removal.

Late in the evening, Rep. Ott proposed a resolution that had the same wording and purpose of amendment 56.  It seemed like a simple solution that would allow S. 897 to be passed as a clean Bill, which was the request of the Senate.  Near midnight Rep. Quinn recalled all the amendments that he had made to S. 897 and a call for a vote was made.  The second vote earned 2/3 of yes votes, which meant there was hope that the Bill would ultimately pass.  The third reading was made and the Bill passed without amendments.

Again the song “I’m Just A Bill” looped through my mind.  It was very much like the legislative process as taught by Schoolhouse Rock.  Only the animated Bill started with an idea and a member from US House of Representatives created a Bill for debate; and upon passing in the House it went to the US Senate.  It was a joyful day to know that the next step was for the Bill to be ratified by the SC Speaker of the House and then signed by Governor Haley.

It was announced that Governor Haley would sign the Senate Bill 897 at 4:00pm on Thursday, July 9th and the flag was scheduled for removal on Friday, July 10th.  While sitting at work I thought it would be enough to see the signing via streaming video or the news.  However, I had witnessed debates by the SC General Assembly and realized I needed to be present for this historic moment.  Driving like a mad woman and using my familiarity with the area around the SC State House I found a parking spot and rushed through the blazing heat to the third floor that overlooked the lobby area set up for the signing.

There was media, citizens, and legislatures packed in to witness the moment as well.  Also present were family members of the Charleston 9 victims including the widow of the Rev. Senator Clementa Pinckney.  In addition, were three former SC Governors including two who had previously tried to discuss removal of the Confederate battle flag.  Specially Governor David Beasley lost his re-election do impart to this debate. Watching the signing of the Bill was emotional because it did show that bi-partisan leadership and agreement can occur.

On Friday, July 10, 2015 thousands of citizens were present to witness the removal of the Confederate battle flag from SC State House grounds.  People poured into the street and around the grounds for a look at history.  There were those in support of the removal as well as those not supporting the removal.  I for one was happy to see the flag removed.  As I have stated I saw its presence as being divisive and conjuring a past of hate.  Just as the reality that the Nazi flag is negative to those of Jewish decent so is the Confederate battle flag to me.  Unable to attend in person, I watched on television with tears flowing from my eyes.  I felt my ancestors rejoicing.  I know that removal of the flag will not make racism and hate disappear.  However, it possibly will help bring discussion and progress toward better race relations.

Finally, some immediate changes that occurred was NCAA is now considering South Carolina for future conferences and tournaments.  The NAACP also has raised its boycott of the state.  During debates of removal of the flag in the Senate and House major corporations submitted letters in support of its removal.  It seemed that people looking in could see that it was long past time for the symbol of an oppressive past to be taken down and put in a museum.  I do believe we must remember history including the ugliness of some of the past…hence we forget.  However, I don’t need to see history blowing in the wind to remember it.

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Why I Vote


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Voting MachineI am the product of generations of activists.  African American along with Native American ancestors who consistently fought for their civic, civil, and human rights.  It is in my blood to be active and present in my own existence.  I first became aware of the political process in the third grade, while attending William H. Brown Elementary School in Chicago.  A huge red voting machine was brought to my school.  Levers and buttons were used to vote for the candidates of your choice.  The machine was intimidating but it helped me to understand that my civic duty of voting might not be easy.

My next experience with politics occurred the summer I turned 10 years old.  I learned about a candidate for President of the United States that hailed from the state of Georgia.  James (Jimmy) Carter seemed to just be a peanut farmer but digging deeper he was a man with clear political goals.  A former State Senator and Governor the political arena was very familiar to him.  I did not know much of about Jimmy Carter when I was a child but his daughter was my age and my parents liked him.  So I decided that he was the candidate, I wanted to win.

I was a freshman in college during the historic 1984 Presidential Election.  Where on the Democratic ticket the first female Vice Presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro was alongside Walter Mondale.  Sadly they lost terribly to Ronald Regan and George H.W. Bush but I was still proud to have cast my first vote.  I knew at that point that I would always vote for the persons I thought best to hold the office.

As I stated earlier voting is not easy.  It takes effort not merely at the polling place but before you enter the building to vote.  Some things that are a must prior to reaching Election Day is to ensure that you are registered to vote.  In some states there are voter identification laws that require approved identification to be presented upon voting.  In many states this Saturday, October 4th will be the last day to register before the Tuesday, November 4th elections.

Many people do not think their vote matters but it does.  It not only matters, it is your civic duty.  Elected officials write legislation and regulations that impact you every day.  From teacher salaries to whether Medicaid is accepted in your state to other impacts to your community, the individuals who win elections have your life and future in their hands.  Voting is a right that other nations are fighting to obtain.  Finally if you fall into the category of minority or are a female this right came with a struggle, fight and bloodshed.  Don’t take your right for granted; remember your vote is your voice, don’t remain silent.

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My Thoughts on Supreme Court Ruling, Shelby v. Holder


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Broken Justice

Broken Justice

This is being written from the gut, it may be revised on a later date but today it is how I feel.  Tuesday, June 25, 2013 on what would have been my maternal grandmother’s 93rd birthday, I was saddened by the ruling of the U.S. Supreme Court.  The highest court of the land upheld the decision in Shelby County, Alabama vs. Holder, Attorney General, et. al that section 4 of the Voting Rights Act was unconstitutional.  In summary what this means is that some specific states and counties primarily in the south can now make changes to their states laws with regard to voting rights without oversight of the U.S Justice Department.  The problem with this is best stated in Justice Ginsburg’s written dissent “Just as buildings in California have a greater need to be earthquake proofed, places where there is greater racial polarization in voting have a greater need for prophylactic measures to prevent purposeful race discrimination.”

On Monday, June 24, 2013 the U.S. Supreme Court sent the case regarding Affirmative Action practices in universities back to the lower court.  Both this and the ruling on Voting Rights Act which I should state was 5 to 4 make it seem that the United States has been cured of all that ails it.  Yesterday in discussing validity of Affirmative Action, I described it as follows.  A person who has a hypertension that is controlled by medicine, may think that because they have no negative symptoms, they can stop taking medication.  However upon stopping their daily heart medicine the symptoms, which they had as well as higher blood pressure will ultimately return.  The educational and vote suppressing symptoms of racism still exist and more so in Southern states, we as country are not yet healed.

When we forget the mistakes of our past we increase the chance of repeating them in our future.  Medgar Evers; Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr; James Chaney; Andrew Goodman; Michael Schwerner and so many more individuals’ lives were lost fighting for voting rights for all citizens.  I thought of them when I learned of the ruling by the court and my heart ached.  There are those who may honestly believe that blatant racism is a thing of the past but I believe it very much does still exist.  There is a need for oversight of some states and I don’t think it will be long before this is evident.  It is now the task of the U.S. Congress to ensure that voting rights for all citizens wherever they reside is kept in place.  If you follow my blog then you know my overall beliefs and I ask you to contact your Senator and Congressman demanding the need for Section 4 of the U.S. Constitution until proven otherwise.

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I TOO AM AMERICA…


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Last month my husband and I took our second journey to Washington, DC to be a part of events for the 57th Presidential Inauguration.  We were part of the millions of individuals who took over the district in 2008.   And after continually being active as part of  both campaigns and helping to move the Obama Administration’s agenda forward, we wanted to be present again.  Like 2008, I reserved a hotel room literally one full year before the inauguration, yes I had that much faith that President Obama would be re-elected.  And after serving as a National Delegate at the Democratic National Convention, I was even more confident.  It never occurred to me that he might loose and I might have to cancel the reservation.

During the journey along I-95, one of my favorite Langston Hughes poems came to mind.  It was actually one of the first poems I memorized.  The last line of the poem reads, “I, too, am America.”  This simple line reflected how I felt during a trip that involved volunteering at the Presidential Inaugural Committee Headquarters; visiting the Russell House Senate Office building; attending the Inauguration in a ticketed area; attending a ground breaking OFA Legacy Conference; attending a White House Policy Briefing for Community Leaders; touring the East Wing of the White House and ending with a visit to the Library of Congress.

For me it just seems right that I would have these opportunities in my nations capitol mainly because my ancestors made it possible.  I was raised to believe that any goal I chose to reach, I could achieve with hard work and God’s grace.  So it just seemed right that this part of what it was to be American specifically North American was my privilege and right.  Yes, I know the reality that there is still racism and ignorance within society but I strive to walk over and through it for I, too, am America.

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I, Too

by Langston Hughes

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I, too, sing America.

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I am the darker brother.

They send me to eat in the kitchen

When company comes,

But I laugh,

And eat well,

And grow strong.

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Tomorrow,

I’ll be at the table

When company comes.

Nobody’ll dare

Say to me,

“Eat in the kitchen,”

Then.

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Besides,

They’ll see how beautiful I am

And be ashamed—

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I, too, am America.

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Source: Poetry Foundation Website http://www.poetryfoundation.org

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A picture says a thousand words, so here are a few thousand to reflect on…

Golden 2013 Inauguration Tickets

Golden 2013 Inauguration Tickets

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Invitation to the 57th U.S. Presidential Inauguration

Invitation to the 57th U.S. Presidential Inauguration

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Best Mode of Transportation in DC

Best Mode of Transportation in DC

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Volunteering at the Presidential Inaugural Committee HQ

Volunteering at the Presidential Inaugural Committee HQ

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South Carolina Digital Desk for National Day of Service

South Carolina Digital Desk for National Day of Service

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Learning the Next Steps for OFA 3.0

Learning the Next Steps for OFA 3.0

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Friends and Fellows for Obama

Friends and Fellows for Obama

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Having Some Fun

Having Some Fun

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The Big Day

The Big Day

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In the Gold Ticket Area, Happy and Waiting

In the Gold Ticket Area, Happy and Waiting

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Hotel Right By Parade Route

Hotel Right By Parade Route

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My Proudest Photo - Taken with my iPhone

My Proudest Photo – Taken with my iPhone

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Learning at the White House Policy Briefing

Learning at the White House Policy Briefing

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Just Inside the East Wing

Just Inside the East Wing

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Looking Fondly Upon a Late Leader

Looking Fondly Upon a Late Leader

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Some of the South Carolina Team with President Clinton Looking Over Our Shoulder

Some of the South Carolina Team with President Clinton Looking Over Our Shoulder

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And We Got Cookies

And We Got Cookies

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A Cookie and a White House Thank You

A Cookie and a White House Thank You

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Library of Congress and the End of a Wonderful Trip

Library of Congress and the End of a Wonderful Trip

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All photos are property of the author.

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